Tag Archives: education

Yayorin’s mobile conservation bus

We recently received a comment on our orangutan.org.uk/blog from Dwi Triyanto asking about Yayorin’s mobile bus. Eddy Santoso, from Yayorin, has sent this short update. You can find out more about Yayorin’s inspiring work on their Facebook page.

 

Eddy Santoso of Yayorin

‘Yayorin’s Mobile Bus has been busy ferrying various organisations including the Indonesian Forestry Department’s fire-fighting agency (Manggala Agni), Agency for Conservation of Natural Resources (BKSDA Kalteng SKW II) and students from the Conservation Club of 3 high schools in Pangkalan Bun, Central Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo.  The groups all assisted with reforestation in Tanjung Keluang Natural Tourism Park, where hawksbill turtles and green turtles lay their eggs.

Yayorin’s mobile bus on a school visit. Photo by Yayorin

In April and May of this year the bus transported the public to plant trees as part of Earth Day and also took students from a local school to the forests of Tanjung Puting National Park. Last month, the bus transported 180 student from Pangkalan Bun to Yayorin’s Sustainable Integrated Agriculture Learning Centre at the village of Sungai Sintuk for a 3 day field trip. The bus is out and about spreading Yayorin’s message ‘People need the forests, forests need orangutans‘.”

If you are interested in sponsoring Yayorin’s mobile bus then please contact us for further information or visit their Facebook page.

Thank you for your continued interest and support,

Orangutan Foundation

Environmental Education in Indonesia

Over the past year, the education team has been extremely busy. It ran education and conservation programmes for 34 schools, 12 villages, 7 government agencies, and one oil palm company.

The activities, which are part of our EC-funded programme,  highlight the need to conserve the Lamandau River Wildlife Reserve for all stakeholders, including the younger generation.

 

School visits around the Lamandau River Wildlife Reserve
School visits around the Lamandau River Wildlife Reserve

© Orangutan Foundation 

Each school visit was evaluated with a quiz for the students to gauge how much information was absorbed. With this knowledge, the aim for 2010 is to concentrate on selected schools to give more thorough attention and time for each conservation education programme. One component was about learning how to separate waste for composting (bins were given to selected schools).

 One school (SMK N 1 Sukamara) was selected as a model to test out a new subject called ‘Ecological farming’ that puts emphasis on sustainable farming, using organic methods. Our community officer, Pak Roji, taught this subject for several months in this school upon approval from the local education district.

 education -testing

Encouraging student participation in environmental education © Orangutan Foundation. 

Soon there will be a meeting with the teachers to obtain their feedback, and to evaluate the effectiveness of this newly introduced subject. The new syllabus will be planned together with the teachers according to their needs.

Thank you to our regular donors, Matthew K, Tal B and Brigitta S – your continued support is more vital than ever. As our field costs (e.g. for running guard posts & patrols, orangutan monitoring and rescues, support for sustainable livelihoods and educational activities etc…)  increase we must maintain our commitment to these important programmes.

If you haven’t already done so please consider making a donation to the Orangutan Foundation. 

With many thanks,

Cathy (Orangutan Foundation)

Lesson by MELU on Forest and Orangutan Conservation

Recently the Mobile Education and Library Unit (MELU), from our EC funded Lamandau Project, visited a local school to give a lesson about forest and orangutan conservation. More than 200 students of SMP 7 Middle First School in Pasir Panjang Village, Central kalimantan assembled in front of their school.  

 Melu visit to local school

 Enthusiasm was etched on their face as they listened to what Fadlik, our educator, had to say. The school yard, though clean, was barren with no big trees growing. So under the hot morning sun, Fadlik enthusiastically invited all the students to learn and understand the important of the forest and orangutan.    

Many questions were asked by the children including why forest and orangutan must be conserved, and what was the difference between orangutan and monkey?

  Melu visit to local school

Teachers watched the interaction between Fadlik and their students with interest. The teachers said their students must learn about conservation.  We hope the student’s love for their forests, their orangutans and other wild animals will increase with these efforts.

Orangutan Foundation out and about in the UK

The Orangutan Foundation office, in the UK, has been actively ‘spreading the word’ at recent fundraising events. Last Friday we were invited to have a stand at Thomas’ Battersea School, London, summer fair. We are very proud to be Thomas’s Middle School’s chosen charity for the next two years. The turn out was great and there was a great buzz with children dashing around taking part in various fun activities.

Elly at Bristol Wildlife Fair

Elly from the office.

Last weekend Elly and I, from the office, travelled to Bristol, in the Southwest of England to man our stand at the annual Bristol Festival of Nature. In spite of torrential rain the turnout was very good and a lot of people took an interest in our stand!

Orangutan Foundation Bristol Festival of Nature

The Festival is incredible, an imaginative weekend of films, animal encounters, exhibitions, walks, talks, workshops and competitions for all ages and interests. Thank you to everyone who came along and said hello. We would also like to thank Matthew and Julie our fantastic volunteers who helped drum up interest!

Support our work by visiting our online shop for palm-oil free soaps & candles, soft cuddly orangutan toys and much much more….

Thanks,

Kristina – Project Co-ordinator

Our Earth Day Celebrations.

On the 22nd April Orangutan Foundation and Yayorin celebrated Earth Day with students from various schools at Sukamara, which lies close to the western part of the Lamandau Wildlife Reserve.

Earth Day

Together with the Yayorin Education Team, the school children took part in a full-day of activities, starting with ‘socialization’ or getting to know each other through a series of games, stickers and magazine were distributed. As well, it wouldn’t be Earth Day without any seedlings being planted! Together, the students planted 60 seeds from four indigenous plants at the Danau Burung Post.

Earth Day

The day ended with a film screening open to all, regardless of age, of various environment-related films, including a popular local film called “Laskar Pelangi” or Rainbow Warriors.

Environment related film screenings

Environmental film screenings

Thanks,

June

Kampung Konservasi (March/April) – A new mobile library!

On Tuesday, 24 March 2009, Yayorin (Yayasan Orangutan Indonesia) received a wonderful donation of MOBIL BACA (mobile library) from PT Hino Motor Sales Indonesia (Hino) to support its education efforts, in areas close to orangutan habitat, in Central Kalimantan Indonesian Borneo.

Bus - mobile educational unit and library

Mobil Baca – Kampung Konservasi’s new bus.

Hino has already donated similar buses to other NGOs in Indonesia, and this year Yayorin was chosen as one of the recipients. The bus was specifically made to suit Yayorin’s need, and is equipped with seats in front and book shelves at the back.

The hand-over ceremony took place in Sampit, a bigger city, which is a four hour drive from Pangkalan Bun. Mrs. Aulia Reksoatmodjo, a board member of Yayorin and Togu Simorangkir, Yayorin Director attended the ceremony. Hino presented Yayorin with a symbolic key, while Yayorin showed its appreciation by giving Hino a carved orangutan wood statue.

Key Presentation

Presentation of the symbolic key to Yayorin.

Presentation parade

Presentation parade

The bus will hopefully start operating this month. We are looking forward to getting out on the road and distributing our conservation education message and materials to the local population.

Kampung Konservasi bus with Togu and Mrs. Aulia Reksoatmodjo

Mrs. Aulia Reksoatmodjo (on far left), a board member of Yayorin and Togu Simorangkir (far right), Yayorin Director.

Thank you,

Sally -Yayorin

The Rainforest Education Pack

Linda you recently asked about activities to educate zoo visitors about orangutans. I would like to recommend the Orangutan Foundation’s Rainforest Education Pack which focuses on orangutans. Although it is aimed at primary school level it has many activities (e.g. nest building, masks, quiz) which could be used or adapted for use in zoos.

Matthew K and Brigitta S. thank you for your monthly donations your regular support is extremely important to us.

A quick reminder that the Big Give www.thebiggive.org.uk are still doubling every pound donated to Orangutan Foundation through their matched funding page on their charity website. There has been an outstanding response so far with over £14,000 having been donated. When doubled, this amounts to £28,000! We are hugely grateful to everyone who has taken advantage of this scheme.

As always thanks for your support and interest,

Cathy – Orangutan Foundation

Kampung Konservasi February Blog – Garbage!

The smoke from garbage burning started to hurt our eyes…million of flies swarmed around us…and the unmistakable aroma of garbage welcomed us as we drove into this local waste collecting location. A trash-picker moved quickly passed us toward the incoming yellow garbage truck; he wanted to be the first to find anything inside that he could sell.

Garbage

Burning garbage at Pasir Panjang waste collection centre.

Student participating in Yayorin’s environmental extracurricular activity seemed a little bit bewildered this afternoon. The main subject of today’s discussion was garbage – its role on the environment, its problems and management. It was obvious that they had never seen as much garbage in their lives and probably felt quite overwhelmed by it.

Most of the students did not even know that such place exists in their city. Many could not even say where the garbage they produced at home or at school went to. In the beginning, they were not happy being ”dragged” into this disgusting place and could not stand the smell. With the passing of time, though, they started to understand why we brought them there and involved entusiastically in the learning process.

Garbage

In this meeting we asked them to identify the types of garbage they could find in an area of 1m x 1m. They then had to identify which ones were organic and which were inorganic. They were also asked to pay attention to how the garbage was collected, transported and managed.

Garbage

The Pasir Panjang Waste Collecting Location is the largest in this city and its surrounding areas. This is where all of the waste of the city finally goes to. Unfortunately, like most garbage collecting locations in Indonesia, the concept of garbage management is through burning. What was ironic was the big sign we saw there that clearly said “Do Not Burn the Garbage”!

The students had a tour around the Location. They found an abandoned composting house, filtering pond and a monitoring well. The well was located about 50 meters from the collection area, and the water inside was quite clean. It was supposed to mean that the soil water was in good condition.

Garbage

The students took home with them a valuable learning experience. We hope that now they realise where their garbage goes, and how the waste can put a really heavy burden on the environment. Next time they want to throw their garbage on the street or anywhere else inappropriate, we wish they will stop and remember their unique experience at the ”garbage place”.

Thanks,

Riyandoko and Sally (Yayasan Orangutan Indonesian www.yayorin.org)

Volunteering In Belantikan – An Absolute Pleasure To Teach

As part of Yayorin’s programme of conservation and community empowerment they are also prioritizing improving education generally for the villagers. It’s this aspect of the programme, and the communities’ request for English language teaching, that led us to go to Belantikan to work in the village schools. Living in Belantikan for one month was an absolute privilege and teaching the children an absolute pleasure. They were a joy to work with, keen and enthusiastic, and seeing them go in one month from speaking no English to confidently expressing themselves in their new language showed the enormous potential they have.

Teaching in Belantikan

Class 3 and 4 in Bintang Mengalih after English class.

It was also funny to hear how the children of these remote villages picked up touches of our distinctive Liverpool accent in their spoken English, which might sound a bit odd to any future English visitors who stop to chat to them. The children also seemed to really enjoy the lessons, although some of their teachers looked a bit bemused watching their students dancing around outside class singing “if you’re happy and you know it clap your hands” or the “happy days theme tune”.

When we were leaving Kahingai after our last lesson there some of the children followed us down to where our boat was waiting on the river. We asked them if they’d rather leave the village behind and go to live in England and they said no. I think their quality of life here, living in this beautiful forest is better, I hope it remains that way.

School Visit to Kampung Konservasi

“By listening I know; By seeing I understand; By doing I make a difference.”

The children enthusiastically approached the two cows in their stable. In their hands were the newly-cut, fresh, green leaves. They waited impatiently for their turns, and their face lit up when the cows ate the leaves.

Feeding Kampung Konservasi’s cows

Feeding the cows is probably a simple and common thing for those who live in small villages and have cows. For these children from Islam Terpadu Elementary School, however, this simple thing became an extraordinary experience. It was probably the first time they ever saw a cow in their life. The participants on this visit were 1st grade students, 55 of them, and 5 of their teachers.

Feeding the cows was one of education activities we conducted during this school visit at Yayorin’s Kampung Konservasi. This outdoor learning focuses to integrate knowledge the children learn from school with some field experiences. This way, students not only understand the theories and facts, but most importantly, understand and respect the knowledge they receive.

School Visit to Kampung Konservasi

Another activity that the children found very exciting was when they were asked to plant vegetable seeds. This time, they planted pokchai ( a type of vegetable similar to chinese spinach) in black polybags. With enthusiasm they grabbed handfuls of soil that was already mixed with organic compost and put it in the polybags. Each of them made a little hole on the soil with a finger, put one seed in it, and covered it with soil. Finally, they carefully watered the planted seeds. The children really loved it!

Sowing Seeds

Other than feeding the cows and planting vegetable seeds, the children also watched an environmental movie in our little theatre and listened to story-telling in the library. The morning passed by very quickly, and everybody was sad when we had to say goodbye.

Kampung Konservasi tries to use nature as a learning ”canvas”…where simplicity and friendship with the environment are keys to understanding and respect. By giving opportunities for young people to express themselves and learn by doing, we are actually influencing their behaviors and future choices. In the long run, we hope that they can then influence others around them, including the adults. When that happens, the world will definitely be a better place!

Thank you,

Riyandoko (Education Facilitator) & Sally (Yayorin)